Tyson Recalls Ground Beef Products Due To Possible E. Coli O157:H7 Contamination

Tyson Fresh Meats Inc., of Dakota City, NE has recalled about 40,948 pounds of ground beef products that may be contaminated with E. coli O157:H7.

The following products are subject to recall:
10-pound chubs of “CHUCK FINE GROUND BEEF 80/20,” packed in cases containing eight chubs.
The products subject to recall have a “BEST BEFORE OR FREEZE BY” date of “11/13/11″ and “EST. 245C” on the box label. The products were shipped to institutions and distributors in Alabama, California, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, South Carolina, Tennessee, West Virginia, and Wisconsin.

The problem was discovered through routine FSIS monitoring which confirmed a positive result for E. coli O157:H7. FSIS and the company have received no reports of illnesses associated with consumption of these products.

E. coli O157:H7 is a bacterium that can cause bloody diarrhea, dehydration, and in the most severe cases, kidney failure. The very young, seniors and persons with weak immune systems are the most susceptible to foodborne illness. Individuals concerned about an illness should contact a health care provider.

FSIS routinely conducts recall effectiveness checks to verify recalling firms notify their customers of the recall and that steps are taken to make certain that the product is no longer available to consumers.

FSIS advises all consumers to safely prepare their raw meat products, including fresh and frozen, and only consume ground beef that has been cooked to a temperature of 160° F. The only way to confirm that ground beef is cooked to a temperature high enough to kill harmful bacteria is to use a food thermometer that measures internal temperature.

Consumers with questions regarding the recall should contact the company at (866) 328-3156.

There is 1 comment. Add yours.

  1. Jailton

    Jaime: Thanks for cotnenmimg. I’ll grant that your general solution might be more ethical and produce more delicious meat but it is definitely not simple. It wil take a huge shift in our consumption and spending patterns that will not happen any time soon.Also, small-scale food production is no guarantee against contamination. The advantages of lower densities and feeding cows grains and grasses that they are more suited to digest must be balanced against the disadvantages of adding each marginal, less skilled, equipped, and inspected farmer to the system as concentration decreases and production spreads more broadly. Anyway, even if we agree that your solution is the way things should be it is not the way they are and in either case vigilance is still critical.Andrew: That’s correct. My understanding is that e. coli cannot contaminate the inside of beef muscle or fat tissue but only lives on the outside of a piece of meat so only that part needs to be sterilised.

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