Ford Recall History Puts Toyota Recalls in Perspective

UPDATE: Looking for the Ford Windstar recall? Click here for the first report from September or click here for a December report on the expansion.

Toyota VS Ford Image

Did you know…
• U.S. Population in 2008: 304 million
• Total U.S. Vehicle Recalls in 2008: 8.6 million
• U.S. Population in 2009: 305 million
• Total U.S. Vehicle Recalls in 2009: 15.2 million

That means in 2008, a mere 3% of the U.S. population had to deal with a vehicle recall, while in 2009, that figure skyrocketed to 5%. While still not nearly as bad as the 2004 figures totaling over 30 million units recalled (which in today’s figures would represent 10% of the population) 2009 still presents some staggering figures for the U.S. driving public to consider.

Toyota led the pack for recalls in 2009 with over 4.8 million units recalled across both the Toyota and Lexus brand names. And 2010 already puts Toyota as a front-runner so far with its Prius recall of over 437,000 units and the subsequent recall of over 4.5 million units for various problems. A Tacoma recall of 8,000 units was added to Toyota’s bill on February 15 as well. But wait – is the hype more bark than bite?

While 5 million units for the Japanese automaker may seem like a sea of cars, there’s another car manufacturer that trumps Toyota in total recalls over time:

Since the NHTSA started keeping records, Ford Motors has recalled over 20 million vehicles, the highest recall year being 1996 with over 7.6 million units. Thus, while the current recall hype might be news to the US consumer who favors Japanese models over their American counterpart, the news of Toyota’s 5 million units recalled could be overshadowed by Ford’s recall history.

It began back in 1972 when Ford issued a recall for over 4 million cars with faulty seatbelt buckles. With indications that the buckles could release in a crash situation, the auto manufacturer recalled cars from its Ford, Mercury and Lincoln brands – every single one of them made during models years 1970-71.

The next major car recall from Ford was the 1996 Ford Explorer recall. The malfunction in question gave it the less-than-favorable moniker “Ford Exploder” as the ignition switches were found to be defective and could catch fire, overheat or otherwise malfunction. Nearly 8 million cars were affected and Ford recalled nearly all its cars manufactured between 1988 and 1993.

2005 wasn’t such a great year for Ford in the recall department, either. While we’re at it, we should mention 2009 as well. Both years resulted in a recall of 4.5 million units each for Ford, and were directly related to cruise control malfunctions. Had the NHTSA combined these incidents into a single report, it would have been the largest recall of all time with an estimated 14 million Ford / Mercury vehicles affected.

While the Toyota news as of late has consumers riled, perhaps it is a good sign for what lies ahead. More stringent manufacturing processes from the already stringent Japanese automakers may be on the horizon. It will be interesting to watch shareholder reactions to both Ford and Toyota alike as the auto recall situation plays itself out through the remainder of 2010.

There are 63 comments. Add yours.

  1. Bruce Harrington

    How many Fords have caught fire since 1970? I can not find this answer.
    Two out of six in my family. That is 33%.

    Reply
  2. Bruce Harrington

    Ford Owners Really Dumb. Ignorance and stupidly in the public is what keeps Ford in business. I once bought a x-cop crown vic at auction to flip, and it took over an hour just to get the dirt and sand out of the spark-plug hole to change the front spark-plug because of the poorly designed boot around the plug wire.
    NEVER, NEVER, EVER BUY ANY FORD!
    ASHES TO ASHES, DUST TO DUST, IF IT WASEN’T FOR FORD OUR TOOLS WOULD RUST.
    Ford – providing 70% of independent mechanic’s business since 1903.

    Reply
  3. delicia

    F-150′s
    Ford Motor Company announced Thursday that it has relented to a request from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) and expanded its recall of F-150 pickup trucks, which have been the best-selling automobile in North America for the past 34 years.
    Believe the massive advertising, stand-up for a corporation that delays recalls of defective parts. You won’t be convinced, until the fire hit’s close to home and you have to visit the morgue to identify your families burned bodies.

    Reply
    • Ricky

      Unfortunately, there are scores of people out there that refuse to buy anything other than “made in America” cars. Good for them, however, if you really want a car that has proven time after time to be dependable and will hold its value better than any American car, BUY AN IMPORT!!!

      Reply
  4. Gary

    Poor Kyle.
    U took it personal, My Grandfather only owned Fords he loved them,
    I was only stating I like my Toyota, And it won’t roll over if you know how to drive.
    Saying I’M Bias was referring to Harley / Toyota because I own both, (I believe in what I own) also Chev, 1970
    454 Monte Carlo.
    I did not try to Offend anyone, Just saying I enjoy what I have, If you like Your Ford
    Then Keep it.
    I’M a firm believer in proper maintenance, will get any Vehicle a long way.
    Also, Looking at buying a New Truck and Ford is on my list as well as Toyota, and
    a few other auto companies.
    Once again, Just stating I like what I own.
    Don’t take things so personal Kyle.

    Reply
  5. Kyle

    Gary good example of Liberal bias. People notice the word usage Gary uses, if you Trust ford notice the capital case T in trust and the lower case f in Ford, ignorantly insulting one of the oldest automotive companies. Then he describes Toyota with a capital T and uses the words reliability and beauty, pushing his thoughts of Toyotas false reliability. Talk about being bias in descriptive word choices. Then he goes on and on Ive owned this Toyota and that Toyota and even this Toyota all never having a problem. Good for you Mr. Gary Toyota. Your a fine example of the flawless Toyota owner, anything I own is #1. I own a 1995 F150 bought it in 2000 had 132k on it, still own it and use it as a plow truck now and it has 496k on it now. Also, owned a 1996 Ford Ranger retired it at 296k to a co-worker and he still has it, that was 4 years ago and his commute to work is about 92 miles each way a day so who knows what mileage it has now. Also owned a 2002 Crown Vic old squad car that had 390k on it had some problems but it had an abused life! Now I own a 2001 F150 and Cobra, the F150 has 69k on it now and the Cobra has 30K on it now. Guess what you guys Ive never had any problems with any of these Ford products minus the abused squad car and general maintenance.

    One last rant from me sorry, please tell me how Ford is responsible for the 1997-2001 gas tank straps and no other truck models are (GM,Dodge,and Toyota even though they have similiar problems with rotting straps after all its a 16 gauge metal gas tank straps in a vehicle thats 10+ years old and 100k+ miles). These vehicles are 10 plus years old, at what point is the government going to stop forcing recalls on companies. These are trucks that Ford doesn’t even have to make parts for 7 years + is the cut off. How, is this a manufacturer fault isn’t it called maintenance something the vehicle owner is responsible for. Its a comon problem in all trucks. I own a 2001 F150 and I check mine every service, its called taking ownerships. OK lets see the government bought GM and Chrysler a couple months later Toyota is the worst company ever millions of vehicles recalled at the governments request. Then Ford starts to do real good passing up both GM and Toyota in the US and then the government decides to force Ford recalls that are on 10+ year old vehicles the F150 and Windstar. F150 lets see 300 problems (showing rust, rusted through or tank falling) in 2.7 million vehicles with majority of them in the 200K range. Thats not even a 1% problem its 1 tenth of a percent problem. That means 99.99 of the trucks are fine like mine. Low blow on both Ford and Toyota by Government Motors.
    Oh and Gary your 2005 Sequoia is the second worst roll over vehicle second to GMs Blazer. And your 1995 Camry is probably due for an engine due to sludging, very common problem that was never a recall. And the Corolla you might want to set the toe to the right to compensate for the horrible left pull into on comming traffic that Corollas have never had to fix since day one.

    Reply
    • E. Sizemore

      I’m not really sure how you equate Toyota bias to Liberal bias. Not all Toyota owners are Liberals and not all Ford owners are Conservative. You make some very great points later on, but starting it like that makes me not want to read them.

      Reply
  6. Gary

    2005 Toyota sequoia !
    No problems, 1 recall that they informed me of = Fixed.
    1995 Toyota camry 100% no problems.
    1977 Toyota corolla bought used had normal maintenance, 250 k miles
    Gave to Son in law and he still drives.
    If you Trust ford then buy one, if you Like the reliability of a Toyota and beauty
    Then Own it.
    Of course i”M Bias I also OWN A Harley !!
    I do know Toyota has always taken care of me.
    Gary.

    Reply
  7. Caer

    I’m putting my post on several “Make a comment” I want as many people as possible to know how Ford treats it’s customers. So sorry if you read this already.

    I HAD a 2003 Windstar 68,000 miles. Only owner. I did the maintenance required. Was garage kept for the 1st 3 1/2 years. The 1st week of Novemeber the dealer took it and said they would get the part in Jan 2011. They paid for the rental. This week they condemed my van due to the 2nd recall. My buy out is $9,000.00. The catch – the dealer pressured me to sign the papers right away. Once I did, I did NOT get a check. 5-7 days, longer if a week-end was involed, but I had to turn in my rental on Friday no matter what I did. Dealer said it was Corp’s rules. When I called Corp they said it was dealer’s rules. When I asked about the other people from the 1st recall waiting 3 months+ for their checks the reply was yes there were delays for the 1st recall buy out. That could happen again. I asked to please keep my rental until I get my check. They said no. It would cost them too much money. But now it is Friday and I have no car to drive to work or get my kids to school. I also have no idea when I will get my check. NEVER A FORD AGAIN!!! I get the van is unsafe. I get this whole thing was a very bad mistake. What I don’t get is how I had to give Ford a check to leave with my van in March of 2003 when I bought it, but now that they are buying it back(due to a major defect) they don’t have to give me my check until they get around to it. The papers said they had a fixed time frame for me to keep the rental. What about a fixed time frame to give me my money. Anyone have any ideas???

    Reply
  8. Kyle

    Dear Stephen and readers;

    You are ill informed about the findings that you have read in your autoblog. You are referring to the Department of energy’s Advanced Technology Vehicle’s Manufacturing Program not the bailout money that the government has given to Chrysler and General Motors. These are conditional loan commitments that the government has given to the D.O.E (a total net worth of 25 billion) which is avaliable to any auto manufacturer or auto parts producer that builds in the U.S (which include US automakers, US manufacturing subsidiaries of non-US-based companies, major US auto parts suppliers, and innovative startups).

    The D.O.E gets applications from these companies and with the contents in these applications the D.O.E will award that manufacturer a conditional loan (the companies that have the best ideas that will make vehicles 25% more fuel efficient than 2005 standards shall be rewarded a loan by the D.O.E)

    So far Ford 5.9 billion, Nissan USA 1.6 billion, Tesla 465 million and Fisker 529 along with others like Tenneco with lower granted loan numbers. This is a loan not a bailout, the D.O.E has about 17 billion of the 25 billion to award still.

    Ford got a big piece because they are revamping facilities across 5 states and they are driving a major upgrade, which include a tone of technologies like the direct injected turbocharged EcoBoost engines (2,4,6 cylinder engines) advanced transmissions, and new hybrid technologies along with revamped combustion engines and hydrogen and electric vehicles etc…. All these are leaps and bounds above what any other manufacturer is offering or has offered.
    And they are already implementing them for example not like G.M sitting on the Volt for 10 years.

    Again General Motors and Chrysler are the only companies that took the 25 billion dollar bailout package and then another 40 billion bailout package. Ford did not take any of this bailout money. Ford did attend the 2008 court hearings because they where planning on buying General Motors if the government was not going to help General Motors or Chrysler. Alan Mulallay Cheif CEO of Ford came out and said they would buy General Motors before it dissolved or Toyota bought them.

    Also, of the 271 deaths you mentioned related to the Firestone/Ford deal 130 of these deaths where directly related to tire failures and the other 141 where related to speeding (80+mph) with aggressive menouvers at these speeds proven with on board computers, lack of maintenance proven with no vehicle maintenance histories through dealers or aftermarket shops. Also deaths and injuries totalled 700. Now these numbers vary depending on surveys and my heart goes out to those who have lost ones these are just the most common numbers reported. Now given the quantity of vehicles that where sold during those years F-series where 800,000+ units a year and Explorers where around 250,000 units a year are actually very low compared to Toyota. During these Toyota problem years Camary sales are about 250,000 units a year, Corolla’s about 150,000 units. So by recall/production/death+injury number ratios Ford is far less than Toyota (based on 90+Toyota related deaths and climbing).

    Last but not least Toyota Camry/Solara is the best selling car not vehicle in the U.S. and its not AMERICAN. The Ford F-series is still #1 with Silverado in #2 spot and the the Camry taking #3. The F-series outsells the Camry by 200,000+ units yearly while the Silverado outsells the Camry by 100,000+ units yearly.

    So Buy American built by an American Company.

    Reply
  9. stephen

    The most American car Is Toyota Camry says car.com
    BUY AMERICAN !

    Reply
  10. stephen

    Ford trucks and SUVs, suffered manufacturing defects found to have contributed to crashes resulting in 271 deaths and more than 700 injuries.

    Reply
  11. stephen

    who says Ford does not nees government money is WRONG.

    The car industry’s second big foray on to Capitol Hill in the past decade? came in November and December of 2008, when GM, Ford, and Chrysler went to Washington for hearings on emergency financial aid.

    Reply
  12. stephen

    Automotive Blog
    Ford wants government money, too.
    Posted by: David Welch on January 15, 2009

    To hear Ford tell the story, the Dearborn (Mich.) company is the smart one that is getting its house in order and doesn’t need government loans like more troubled rivals General Motors and Chrysler. That’s mostly true. Ford borrowed enough in the open market before the credit markets froze up. But to say that Ford isn’t seeking a big chunk of Federal funds is a bit misleading.

    Right now, Ford has says its future product programs qualify the company for up to $11 billion of the DOE’s $25 billion program. The company figures it may only get about $5 billion, though. GM wants $8 billion from the DOE loan program, which extends credit for projects resulting in better fuel economy. It can be advanced vehicles like the Chevrolet Volt electric car or to tool up plants for more prosaic fuel sippers like the Chevy Cruze compact. Others are seeking funds, too. Even tiny Tesla Motors wants $450 million from the DOE.

    Adding in the $13.4 billion or more that GM needs from the Treasury Department to stay afloat and its borrowings are much more. The company will eventually be heavily indebted to the federal government. But Ford clearly needs a boost, too. And it’s no wonder. Not only are the new fuel economy regulations forcing automakers to retool many of their models, Ford has plenty of cash problems. In the third quarter, Ford burned $7.7 billion in cash while GM burned $6.9 billion. For the first three quarters of last year, Ford burned through $15.7 billion while GM went though $14.1 billion.

    Developing new models and technology is a massive expense for carmakers. If the DOE agrees that many of Ford’s future models qualify for the program, it could end up borrowing more from the DOE than GM under the program. Bottom line: Ford’s problems are less urgent than GM’s issues. But let’s curb our enthusiasm a bit.

    Reply
  13. Kyle

    I have been an automotive tech. for about 4 years now. Every manufacturer has issues. For individuals to sit here and debate Ford or Toyota are just ignorant. Toyota is not even a full line manufacturer (No H.D. pickups or any full size vans) not to mention there full size cars are really domestic/european midsizes, not picking on them just pointing out facts. Everyone prides Toyota’s reliability, why their methods and principles are horrible.
    Now the Domestics have to deal with this thing called the automotive Union (not bad mouthing the UAW just pointing out more facts). The average Domestic plant assembler makes about 70+ dollars an hour with all benifits included, thats at or over 141,400 dollars a year to each plant manufacturer, 11,783 a month to each plant assembler (with about 250,000 gross employees Ford). Now lets look at the Asian home land payouts for plant assemeblers (this is the Asian UAW) its about 346000 yen a month with benifits (little benifits in which they have with very odd work schedules) thats 26 dollars an hour on our 80 hour pay frame in which they actually work more so its really less an hour. Thats only 4,128 dollars a month equaling 49,536 a year on our scale (with about 320,000 gross employees Toyota). 100,000 less than the average Domestic UAW. Thats alot of extra money the Asian companies have to put to their reliability, infact they should have no reliability issues since they pay near zero import tariffs (thank goodness for paying off politicians). Thought Americans where dead set against sweat shopes? If you really are stop buying products made in them!!!!!!!!!!

    Now for the people who say well Asian car companies make vehicles in the states. Look where, 90% of the Asian (and European) car companies build their plants in Alabama, why its cheap labor and most of them are non union and the profits still go back to Asian/European company not a American company. Domestics have plants all over the states look at Ford dumping 100′s of millions into a new Chicago union plant I wish Benz would do that.

    People stating that the big three copy Asian car lines is pretty funny. Asian companies couldn’t even build a car till the mid to late 1930′s, thats 30+ years after the Europeans and Americans have been doing it successfully. Then it took them about 46 years to build them somewhat reliable and correctly. Lets face it there are not many 70′s,80′s even early 90′s toyotas still on the road in comparison to the domestics and European imports ( I don’t care if you have one I know someones gonna say I have one and its great in general). Now lets think and see what type/model did the Asian car companies ever invent or perfect without copying, sedan no, coupe no, roadster no, pickup no, fullsize van no, mini-van no, convertable no, SUV no, crossover no, compact car no, sub-compact car no, hydrogen no, cng no, hybrid no no no, so on… they have not designed one model of vehicle all they have done is copied copied copied European and American ingenuity.

    All vehicles now, minus the hand built specialties are built to the same tolerances by robots not Americans or Asians or Europeans. Pontiac Vibe=Toyota Matrix, Ford Ranger=Mazda B-series, Ford Fuzion=Mazda 6, Dodge Charger=Mercedes E/ClS class so on (many many others). How can the Pontiac Vibe get poor reviews but the Matrix was raved, the Ford Ranger is a reliable truck but the Mazda B series is a poor design, the ford Fuzion is the number 1 midsize and the Mazda 6 came in last or the Dodge Charger ranked reliable when the E/CLS where ranked unreliable. What it comes down to is the ending spot of the dollar. As an American I want my dollar to stop at an American company not go over seas. So America as a nation please stop, think and not rely on what others have to say including myself and especially the media/magazines etc… The automotive industry is one of the last manufacturing bases the U.S. has and how do we support it we buy Nissans instead of Pontiacs and Olds (history gone) or Lexus’s, Infinities (remanned Toyotas and Nissans), instead of Cadillacs and Lincolns (remanned G.Ms , and Fords). In reality the only cars that should be imported are the high end luxury one’s since American and Asian compainies clearly cannot make them. Asian car makers have always copied American/European ones and they will alway’s copy them, there is not a place for copies in this world and there is no reason for second rate compainies to sell mimics of the originals in this country at a cheaper price grossing more profit and paying there employess less. Support Domestic or go High end Euro help save the originals, they’ve been around forever enough with this cheap throw away stuff.

    Thank you and sorry for any grammar errors
    By the way Ford never took any bail out money from the government they can but they haven’t. Also NASA has helped Toyota and confirmed the cause of its problems but Toyota is still denying it and now they are recalling all of the same cars due to first repair not fixing concern and spring from wrong repair braking and poping out of place on the first gas pedal recall so the same 5million are comming back.

    Reply
  14. Reggie

    The pedal assy. that Toyota used that had problems was made in the USA. The one that did not give trouble was made in Japan.

    Reply
  15. Jim

    I see that many of these people writing letters are talking about the Pinto’s from 1970 till the late 70′s.
    Lee Iacocca was credited as the father of the Mustang, but in reality, the only cars that Lee Iacocca was the father of was the Pinto and the Mustang II. Iacocca was told from the start, by Ford Engineers of the gas tank problems, but he was first a salesman, and he would like to use catch phrases. HIs catch phrase for the Pinto was 2000 for 2000, wich meant 2000 pounds of car for $2,000 dollars. If he would have been straight with Henry II, he would have put the parts in that would have rectified the gas tank probem, but that would have meant that the car would have to be sold for $2,025, and his catch phrase would have to be dumped in the toilet, so he ignored the engineers and sold the Pinto’s as is. FoMoCo had its problems in throughout the 70′s but so did GMand Chrysler. When comparing cars, the Pinto was in fact a better built car than the Vega, but because of Iacocca’s ego, the Pinto took the bad press and it would up costing FoMoCo more money to pay off law suits than they made profits on the Pinto. Henry II, was never an Iacocca backer, and the Pinto was the final straw that broke the camels back, that was one of the many reasons that Henry II fired Iacocca.
    The Big Three was lucky to survive the 70′s, with cars that sputtered and often stalled out on the hiways, but entering the 80′s, Ford got its act together and was the Number 1 selling cars and trucks, whle GM and Chrysler were still trying to get there acts together, thanks to the new President of FoMoCo, Caldwell.
    Being number 1 is a hard thing to do, as GM knew as well as Ford, they both sat on their laurels and let smaller companies such as Toyota pass them by. But Toyota fell into the same trap when they became number 1, and they produced dangeous cars but they didn’t owe up to them, they tried to cover up their tracks, but got caught just like Lee Iacocca did.
    In Lee Iacocca’s book, he dedicated one small paragraph to the exploding Pinto’s, but patted himself on the back throughout the book regarding the Mustang. Lee Iacocca was a bean counter, and he would save money in other areas to show that the Company was in the black during his presidency at Ford.
    Let us count where Iacocca was saving money. He did in fact eliminate oil feed holes in the cam shaft of the Pinto’s 2300 CC engine, and the small block 302, and I wonder why the cam shaft was always the first thing to go n the Pintoand the 302′s?- Iacocca would disregard leaking roofs in the factories, and the result was rusted machinery and dies that had to be junked. There are many more things that Iacocca did so make himself look good, but it didn’t get past HenryII. Iacocca even had a fellow Allentown Paison by the name of Fragossi, who was a friend of Roy Cohn, the shyster lawyer, and it was Roy Cohn that tried to drag Henry II’s name through the mud with false accusations against HenryII, which proved to be false.
    Any Company is only as good as its employees, and if the head of the Company is a poor manager, it trickles down to all of the other employees.
    Allen Mullally is taking Ford to great heights, and he is showing that he is a honest man, and that in turn is showing in the quality vehicles that are now coming out of Ford. There is no denying that Ford is selling high quality and well engineered and styled vehicles, and their equity is some of the highest in the industry.
    I am proud of Ford Motor Company, since they never backed away from a fight since it was founded in 1903, and with a man like Mullally leading the Company, and mentoring Billy Ford, the Company will again be profitable and copied by all the other companys through the first half of the 21st Century, and I am sure that Old Henry I is smiling down from above to see that his company is again taking the right path.

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  16. Keith E Gestring

    The Govt is out to get toyota and fine them as much as possible. What about ford on their windstars on the axles, they knew about this since 2000, no fines why. The secy of transportation must be in bed with them, what are they doing your guess is as good as mine. What about thje 800,000 of GMC the heaters for the winshield catching fire, no fine why? Since Obama owns PART OF GMC no fine, who is kissing each other ass.?

    Reply
  17. Mark Erwin

    Dear Darin
    I really dont care to sit and sling poo all night however I work in Indiana ,building Toyota vehicles that we are prud of, please do me a favor and research the Ford Pinto scandal and how Ford decided to handle it. thanks for your time and even though I dont agree with your point I admire your Loyalty to your brand kudos to you and American Pride

    Reply
  18. dale on the left coast

    Good Driver . . . . up until the big expose about 4 years ago . . . Toyota kept their recalls SECRET . . . Fact!!! The memo released from Toyota headquarters braggin about how their bought and paid for NHTSA officials has stopped a large recall in 2005 and how it had saved Toyota millions . . . . kind of woke up the thinking folks.

    Remember back in the late 80′s . . . toyota V6 . . . every one blew head gaskets, sometimes more than once, took toyota 10 years to figure that one out. Forefunners around here are called “Flippers” cause a quick lane change at speed will have them on their roof . . . I have seen it myself. Only in the last 6 or 7 years have toyota and honda had five star frontal crash ratings . . . why??? Ford and GM had five star frontal crash ratings in the 80′s and 90′s.
    Trucks . . . Toyota trucks are the biggest joke on the planet . . . weak frames, gas guzzling 5.7 V8, Tundra worst in class.
    Where I live Ford is outselling toyota . . . . Hyundai passed Honda 2 years ago . . .

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  19. dale on the left coast

    Henry Clayton . . . every change the fluid in your rear???
    In the rust belt . . . 7 and 8 year old Japanese cars are in the junk yard already.

    Name me one 60′s japanese car that was better than a Mustang of Fairlane?
    Name me one 70′s japanese car that was better than a Mercury or Granada?
    Name me one 80′s japanese car that was better than a Crown Vic or 5.0 Mustang?

    I drove a new 69 Toyota Corolla . . . after I got out I could not stop laughing . . . it was a JOKE!!!
    I drove a 76 Civic . . . on a quited nite you could hear it rust . . . laughable!!!
    I drove an new 87 Prelude . . . another poser car with hi priced parts. Of course all the 60′s, 70′s and 80′s toyotas and hondas rusted 3 times faster than domestics.

    And of course the final proof is at the auction house . . . seems a 60′s Camaro, Mustang, Oldsmobile or Buick can bring some pretty serious money . . . where are all these wonderful Japanese cars???

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  20. dale on the left coast

    Since 2004 Toyota has recalled over 20 million vehicles, starting with the unpublished steering shaft separation, then yaris seatbelt fires, then runaway Toyotas, gas tanks and spare tires falling off 8 yo Tacomas in the rust belt, air bag issues, stalling issues, 2010 Corollas brakes failing in below freezing weather, 2nd excellerator recall last week and on and on. Since 2004 Ford has had almost NO RECALLS of 2004 and newer vehicles.
    In 2009 all Fords received the IIHS No. 1 in safety awards, most Toyotas failed, including All Lexus vehicles. 2010 with the new roof strength regulations Ford had several firsts . . . All Toyotas and Lexus vehicles FAILED.
    Toyota and the Japanese govt bribed NHTSA officials, politicalns and journalists for decades . . now the chit has hit the fan. Toyota buys the cheapest parts, many sourced in China . . . any wonder their cars are so crummy.

    My son works for an oil change place . . . always asks the Toyota owners with high mile V6 vehicles if they still have their original engine . . . very few answer yes . . . one fellow with over 240 k on his Camry was on engine no. 3.
    They put a 2001 Tacoma on the 2 post at the local tire store the other day, when they raised it up 4 feet to check the brakes it bent in half . . . more Toyota quality I guess. Toyota owners are some of the most auto-illiterate people I know.

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  21. Henry R Clayton

    I have a 2004 ford suv mountaineer and the rear end bearings are going bad.The rear was fixed while under warranty 1 time.Is ford having problems with this.

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  22. delicia

    “2005 wasn’t such a great year for Ford in the recall department, either. While we’re at it, we should mention 2009 as well. Both years resulted in a recall of 4.5 million units each for Ford, and were directly related to cruise control malfunctions. Had the NHTSA combined these incidents into a single report, it would have been the largest recall of all time with an estimated 14 million Ford / Mercury vehicles affected. ”
    You forgot to add not only would many have cars/trucks and vans would have been recalled. Many people would be alive today, houses would not have burned down, lives would not have been destroyed IF……….. Ford Motor Company would have done the responsible action and recalled ALL the vehicles that contained the defective cruise control switch!!!!! or better yet, when Texas instruments advised Ford that the design provided to them was leaking and may cause fires, NOT accept and place this defective part in vehicles for it’s consumers to purchase. What do we call people who knowing put people in harms way ? Yet, Ford Motor Company fights the grieving, punishes the consumer in court Knowing that They are responsible for deaths, houses burning down, people loosing their cars hence: transportation to work etc.
    This company is the worse , not only do they take your money for a product, they provide you vehicles that can kill you and your family, then blame you, charge you!

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  23. delicia

    Ford Motor Company placed a defective cruise control switch into millions of vehicles. A defective switch that could and has caught fire in many of it;s consumers vehicles. One of the vehicles belonged to me. My son Payton Lewis and his girlfriend Samantha Ely burn to death in this car on 12-9-2006 this was 7 months before……. I received the first recall notice in August of 2007.
    Ford Motor Company settled the wrongful death lawsiut with the family of Samantha Ely the passenger, but denies that Ford is at fault for Payton’s death.
    I pray all who reads this, understands the risk of fire that is under the hood of there car is deadly and not something to put off or debate about. If my car had been recalled and the switch diconnected , my son and Samantha should be alive today. Payton could have got married had children, but our family will never experience this love , we crave so much. Our family is destroyed, as is many other families, we are not the only ones. Be safe and take care of your family. Don’t wait for Ford Motor Company to grow a conscience. Because they wont! They will rip your family apart even further through the court system.
    Ford Motor Company continues to expand, create, fight legal battles to assure Ford’s bottom line. Buy a safe quality vehicle for your family, don’t believe the hype of the continous ads Ford has purchased on every network available.
    God Bless your family

    Reply
  24. Good Driver

    A few items I wanted to respond to…

    Nicholas on March 7th, 2010 7:04 pm: “They are very good at watching over their production processes, but you know Toyota has consistenly ranked below Cadillac, Buick and Lincoln in quality…so American OEMs can make good cars!”

    You just named three *luxury* brands… of course they would rank higher in “quality” over any affordable/regular brand of vehicles. It’s a comparison of apples and oranges. The Ford and Toyota brands are the focus here because they’re ubiquitous. If a line of BMWs got recalled, the media wouldn’t be making as big of a deal because it doesn’t affect the everyday Joe Schmoe. And yes, American OEMs *can* make good cars, but that’s not the point here — the article never stated otherwise.

    Bruce on March 22nd, 2010 1:00 am: “Ford has been in business since 1903. if you take the total amount of recalls since the NHTSA stated of course Ford’s numbers will be higher. Duh!”

    Toyota has been in business since 1937. I don’t believe Ford had any recalls prior to Toyota’s founding. I think the comparison is pretty fair.
    But it might be more “fair” to find the percentages of recalled vehicles out of the total number of vehicles manufactured. When purchasing a new vehicle, I think using a percentage from each brand would be a better representation of the likelihood that your new car will get recalled.

    P.S. I’ve owned both a Ford (2003 Escort ZX2) and Toyota (2007 Corolla LE), both purchased new. I gotta say, I have a better time with the Toyota. But my next car will be European. :)

    Reply
  25. Lawanda Gillis

    Do you think that the problems one has with a vehicle or vehicles might have something to do with the proper maintenance of the vehicle (disregarding recalls, of course)? My husband and I have never driven anything but Ford/Mercury/Lincoln products in our 41 years of marriage. We currently have a 2006 Mustang GT, 2004 F250 that is used to pull a livestock trailer, a 1971 F150, and a 2010 Flex. Love the Flex! I don’t understand why they are not selling like hotcakes. It is a great vehicle. Anyway, we have never had any major problems with a Ford product. But then my husband makes sure that regular maintenance is done on all of our vehicles. We might have had the same success with any brand vehicle, but if something is not broken you don’t try to fix it. So we stayed a Ford family.

    Reply
  26. Simon

    I recently returned from overseas. It seems that the whole world is aware that all of the recalled Toyotas were manufactured in the US. Interesting that this is not in the US news. If you follow the money trail on who benefits, you’ll see the source of these issues…

    Reply
  27. Johnnie

    Daren from Feb 16 brings some interesting information to light but is clearly biased. His whole arguement is built on minimizing ford’s defects while restating toyota’s issues like it was breaking news and using sensational speech to sway opinions. He talks about how ford was raked over coals by the media , and how the fords recalls were a result of mechanical failure and not engineering flaws, which is true for the examples he provided, but what about the ones he didnt. The ford pinto is a good example. The pinto’s gas tank was at risk of exploding because of engineering flaws.

    Reply
  28. Uncle B

    In 1973 Ford fathered the “Pinto” a death-trap, firebomb design failure, and foisted it on the American public for years after. Rather than fixing the problem, or changing the design, Ford elected to follow the cheaper route – pay the claims as they came in! Americans were willfully burned to death. Maimed and injured to protect the shareholders best interests and the business community and American courts applauded the erudite and circumspect adherence to Corporate law that Ford followed – Corporatism and Capitalism are the cancer of this great democracy. For another sick and sad situation that proves this point, Google, torrent, the movie,”Who Stole The Electric Car?” and study it carefully. American patriots lost big time again at the corrupt corporate hand. ‘Buyer Beware’ is an American mantra, even for young American school kids who have no idea what is in their lunch-meat.

    Reply
  29. fred

    ever notice how people speaking good about ford use facts and when they try and deffend other brands its just opinions.. just drive a ford for a while and there will never be a going back.. th only other option is audi.. the rest is basically scrap parts bolted together esp dodge and chevy

    Reply
  30. Bruce

    This was obviously written by a pro-Toyota person, hoping to skew the data to make it appear that this recall is small in comparison.

    Ford has been in business since 1903. if you take the total amount of recalls since the NHTSA stated of course Ford’s numbers will be higher. Duh!

    BTW, does Toyota even acknowledge a problem with their vehicles? And it appears that they do not even know how to find or fix the problems. So the resort is to deny the deaths happen and then make the people who report accelerator problems look like they are lying.

    WTG Toyota. Grow some balls and fix your stuff. BTW, your recall numbers will continue to grow. This issue in still in the process. I suppose the government will make you fix your cars, since you will not on your own.

    Reply
  31. JoDee

    OK I have State Farm auto insurance, and the rate for my 2003 Toyota Tacoma went up over $100.00 dollars inthe last 6 months due to in their words “medical payments and personal injury claim experience” has warranted an increase. I have had no accidents/tickets nor claims in many many years. I have’t called State Farm yet (am waiting for policies on my other vehicles to come in) but am wondering if this is all related to the recall on Toyota’s? Anybody else had the same experience?

    Reply
  32. Bob

    I have owned Ford trucks(the worst) chryslers(not much better than ford) GMC’s (the best domestic) and Toyota’s. While livng near Detroit I felt it was my duty to drive American made cars. I’m done with that, they just don’t hold up. I don’t want to rive a vehicle that I am constantly putting money into. I have to say though the Suburban that spun a main bearing at 14K miles, the Yukon that had the tranny that fell apart at 36K miles, and the V10 Excursion that had rod-rattle at 56K miles all were repaired under warranty, (we won’t discuss the F150 or the Grand Cherokee both must have been built on a Friday.) My current Toyota truck with 105K miles hasn’t broke yet, My previous Toyota truck with 205K miles never broke either. I don’t beleive this recall media hype for a second. I have a V8 Tundra and If I put the gas pedal to the floor, and then slam on the brakes the truck will stop…The engine is not as powerful as the brakes. As a tax payer I would like to sell my stock in GM, does anyone know how I can do that.

    Reply
  33. Nicholas

    Before you criticize the US Auto Industry for having to grovel for a bailout, do some research to understand the Japanese government has pumped billions into Toyota, Honda and especially Nissan over the past 15 years. Also research that according to Japanese law, the government does NOT have to disclose the accuracy of these details to the public. There is no denying Toyota has built production facilities here in the United States…you’re an idiot if you don’t realize there are still many of these production facilities for American OEMs (in fact more facilities and higher capacity facilities than Toyota). The arguement begins when you start to understand that the OEMs ASSEMBLE parts made by others. The majority of foreign OEM Engineering work is done outside of the United States. They also value relationships with Japanese suppliers and use American suppliers ONLY when they have to. I work in the auto industry and have dealt with Toyota many times. They have pros and cons like everyone, but they do not wish to work with Americans unless they ‘have’ to. The Indiana supplier of the pedals is what you call a ‘build to print’ facility. They received a product drawing with tolerances and built it. I can also confrim that the Toyota Engineers I’ve dealt with are some of the stupidiest people in the entire automotive industry. They are very good at watching over their production processes, but you know Toyota has consistenly ranked below Cadillac, Buick and Lincoln in quality…so American OEMs can make good cars!

    Reply
  34. haddadadad » Blog Archive » I Smell Bull(ying)

    [...] are pushing hard to stay ‘Merican and be bigger and better. How’s this for bigger: in 1996, Ford’s recall of their Explorers affected over 7.6 million units, 2.6 million more than what Toyot…. “The malfunction in question gave it the less-than-favorable moniker ‘Ford Exploder’ [...]

    Reply
  35. E. Sizemore

    YOUP,

    Your link got removed because, as a rule, we don’t allow people to drop links into comments. There is too much spam out there. If you want to mention a website fine, but it can’t be a link. Google “link spam” or “comment spam” for more information. Although I’m sure yours wasn’t spam, it is just a rule that we have and we don’t make exceptions.

    Thank you for your comment. And no, we would never “silence” people.

    Staff

    Reply
  36. youp

    how come the link i post here get removed?!?

    they try to silence ppl here?
    anywayz search, ford gas pedal global mail in google, you will find that Ford is using the same paddle as T

    Reply
  37. jake

    No doubt that the government will recoup the money they invested in GM. WoW, what a concept. The government rubbing out Toyota to make Obama’s bail out look like it was worth the investment of American tax payers.
    Shame on you Obama, for wasting MY money!
    This is why the government has no place in business.

    Reply
  38. youp

    The paddle thing happens to Ford as well. Ford is using the same as T. The detroit auto show for ford as successful but now reading this and the link above, not consider ford anymore

    what u think

    Reply
  39. John Gengler

    I smell a rat. Most of the American car companies have problems or had problem. The media does not talk or discuss the problems that have happened to the American public. When the Toyota problem came to light and the news agencies began hammering the public, did you notice the sudden increase of ads for GM cars. I did not see an ad for Dodge for months until a couple of weeks age. I believe the automotive lobby in Washiington is funding Congress to investigate the Toyota industry, and the lawyers are rubbing their hands and hoping for a windfall. It certainly cannot do any harm to the American automotive industry. If the American public can be convinced that Toyota is lacking safety and reliability, this will be a win for the American auto industry. This is specially true after the bailout of Chrysler and GM. If the lobbyist and the news media can convince the public about the danger of Toyota cars, this will boost the job market in Detroit.

    Reply
  40. Tu Tran

    Indeed, I think Hiep and Wes are correct.

    It was somewhere around 2006 or so that I read in both my Road & Track and Motor Trend magazines that Toyota will surpass GM in becoming the world’s single largest automobile manufacturer. Now you cannot get to that achievement without cutting some corners. A typical goal of any company, regardless of industry, is growth. When a company puts growth ahead of quality or customer service, things will go badly for them.

    Every automaker has recalls, that is just the way it is. Sometimes it is more severe than other recalls and it gathers media attention. And when you DO produce more vehicles than any other carmaker, of course you are more likely to have a bigger recall.

    And to those people who are thinking about commenting about American vs. Foreign, no matter what brand it is, it is better and more cost effective to build vehicles in the country where you will sell them. That is why Honda, Toyota, BMW, Hyundai among others have plants in the US and employ American workers.

    Reply
  41. Brian Escude

    I would still trust a Toyota any day over any of the Big Three. They have a problem and are fixing it, just like when Ford had its seat belt problem or Firestone Tire problem. The only difference is I don’t remember Ford offering to come get the car from my house and paying for rental cars, like Toyota is willing to do. If you think the Toyota recall is such a pain, try buying a GMC. My 2008 1500 has been in the shop 10 times in 2 years and I still have the same problem. Toyota is a great product and doesn’t deserve all the media hype!!!

    Reply
  42. Wes

    I think the media has WAY overblowned (notice i only use caps on one word?) this so-called Toyota crisis. I think an increase an in consumer demands (wanting the best of everything) is also part of the blame. I mean did anyone notice the recent 200000 Volkswagen recall or the 47000 Hyundai Sonata Recall.? Also, the rise in complaints only occured after the fact that the recall was announced in the media? What is to say that alot of the complaints are because people want something to blame on? Or you’ll see that some news organizations say that the Toyota recall has caused 29 deaths, although it is actually 5 confirmed and 29 possibly linked?

    The thing is Toyota has issues with some of it’s vehicles that in still small likely event cause problems. But the thing is every single car company does. But Toyota unlike some car companies (GM, Ford in the past), has continually built reliable cars, have taken care of their customers for a long time, and has been from how I see it , upcoming and forward with information. So i ask all paranoid consumers, take a deep breathe and realize your more than likely to be fine, take things into perspective, and realize the media like to blow things up.

    Reply
  43. Sarah

    Darin, you mentioned the cruise control in the Ford’s that were faulty and caught on fire being outsourced. I used to own and Expedition that was recalled because of it. Did you know that the faulty brake pedals were outsourced by an automotive supplier located in Indiana? Not a Toyota product. Just something to add to your comment! I own two Toyotas & love them. We will continue to support, love & drive our vehicles. We love our made in the USA Toyotas!

    Reply
  44. Kandis

    Toyota Rav- 226,000 miles and it keeps going! I spent no more than 2000.00
    in the 14 years i have owned it- i dread the day i need to have to purchase a new car!

    Reply
  45. Jeff

    Toyota vs. Ford…not even close…I have never had 1 problem with any of my Toyotas.

    Isn’t if funny that Toyota has never had so many recalls/bad press until they starting opening up all these plants in the USA? What does that say about American workmanship? And now all the media can do is throw Toyota under the bus. Has anyone mentioned that all the recalled Toyotas were manufactured in the good ole US of A?? no, not a word about that! Or that GM, Ford & Chrysler all use the same pedal that Toyota does? Bet you wont see all the media hipe when they start their recalls… Toyota has always been at the top of the quality game in auto manufacturing & they will learn from this, and be back on top again and it won’t cost the American govt one red cent.

    Reply
  46. jake

    I apologize, I have never owned a Sienna.
    My GMC Sierra blew the head gaskets at 80k.
    I have driven several Sienna’s they ride great!

    Reply
  47. jake

    “NONE OF THESE VEHICLES WERE MADE IN THE LAST 6 YRS” It seems like Ford knew about this problem for a long time and did nothing.
    “I INVITE PEOPLE TO INVESTIGATE NUMEROUS OTHER EVENTS WHERE TOYOTA KNOWINGLY ALLOWED IT’S CUSTOMERS TO DRIVE DEFECTIVE CARS FOR YEARS!” WoW! Ford would not do that would they?
    “THE FACT THAT TOYOTA KNEW AT LEAST 3 YRS AGO” Ford has had the fire problem for at least ten years.
    “AS FOR THE OBAMA GM MEDIA, GOV’T CONSPIRACY THEORISTS, ASK YOURSELF WHY A GOV’T AGENCY THE NHTSA ROLLED OVER FOR TOYOTA 3 YRS AGO WHEN THE EVIDENCE WAS IN THEIR HANDS.” The Gov’t only invested in GM with OUR money last year.

    “Sure many people died in the Explorer/Firestone tire debauchery – but the bottom line was that the Firestone Tires were woefully defective and that Ford’s mistake was to use them without testing them thoroughly” Who is at fault here?

    By the way, my Sienna blew the head gaskets at 80,000 miles and my wife’s Oldsmobile blew a transmission seal at 70000 miles. I was sure glad I paid for an extended warranty.
    My S-10 was plagued with the inevitable breaking crankshaft.
    I am glad we both drive Toyota’s now.

    Reply
  48. SoIsFordTellingAll

    I wonder if Ford is telling all? (or any other Manufactures) Everyone is yelling at Toyota and complaining about slow response, lack of information etc.

    But in one of the recent recalls announced by Toyota (a voluntary recall meaning they did it before the NHTSA said to) of 8000 Tacoma Trucks, Detroit News also reported that 14,000 plus Ford/Mercury vehicles and 11,000 plus Nissans used the same part from the same supplier and NEITHER Ford or Nissan were issuing a recall on the part.

    Reply
  49. zeno

    sure darin…
    toyota vs ford (fix or repair daily)
    this may be a big problem but compared to the issue every ford car has.. lol
    lets just ask american consumers which brand of car they would prefer toyota or ford.. =] in other words toyota>ford

    Reply
  50. isaac

    Dear Darin,

    The ford cruise fires did infact kill several people. And I’d be very shocked to find out after 600 fires, no one was injured.. And if we’re going on numbers here.. how many people died in the exploders? over 200 I believe… compared to Toyota’s, less than 1/4 of that right?

    You might want to check your facts.

    Reply
  51. Hiep Nguyen

    Everyone’s need to remember the rule is: if the production focus only on volume and not focus on quality normally will get problem, specially the defect product involves with death and injured, human life can’t replaceable,

    Reply
  52. Snow

    I think the US government is taking this opportunity to pin the Japanese carmakers to spruce up its US car industry

    Reply
  53. Clay

    Darin,

    I’m glad that you are so patriotic, but the data as quantified in this report is accurate and qualified. Also, when writing, it’s best not to write in all-caps, it makes it look like you are screaming whilst being more difficult to read, the combination of which would lead many to decline to continue reading your comment. You also used a pejorative colloquialism that lumps all drivers of foreign-manufactured vehicles into some kind of unpatriotic sense of mind. When you look at the design and performance history of American automakers and European and other foreign marques, you notice a significant pattern. Daimler, Audi, or BMW will introduce a new feature or change the aesthetics of the design of its vehicles, which will be mimicked by Toyota, Nissan, or Honda and their subsidiaries, and the Japanese equivalent will be almost copied five years later with the release of a new American vehicle. In my opinion this is why no one wants to drive American vehicles – they are all too little, too late.

    And yes, no matter how you spin it, Toyota has a ridiculously better safety record and recall record than Ford. Period.

    Reply
  54. Glenn

    Have a 98 Explorer. I never paid attention to the 26 psi. I ran more and never had an issue with the tires, but got them replaced anyway. But more to the point, when the accidents were investigated, in most cases, the investigators found that the tires that didn’t blow were not even at the 26 psi level. 15 to 20 psi was more the norm. The people did not do normal maintenance, then drove at high speeds in high temperatures. Have 175,000 on the Explorer now … all orignial except for normal maintenance items …. Also had an F250 for 725,000 miles. Have a Sierra right now with 130,000 miles of pulling a 7,000 lb trailer all over the country. You just don’t see the Toyotas doing that. When I was commuting a lot, I did have a small Toyota for a while, but it began having problems at 80,000 miles, so I sold it before it began to cost money. Most of the people that love them, don’t keep them long term to see what happens at 150,000 miles and up. Granted, some do, but people that I have known, especially truck owners that tow and keep things until they wear out, always seem to use Ford or GM trucks. My mother-in-laws 2006 Prius has been a pain in the ass. Oh well. What a feeling ….

    Reply
  55. Dennis Gallagher

    I have been buying Toyota vehicles for over 25 years and the current problems with some of their models does nothing to diminish the reliability and quality of the vehicles I have owned over this time period. Granted, they certainly could have handled the problem in a more forthright manner, but I believe their current problems will be resolved and they will emerge an even stronger company. If it wasn’t for the Asian automakers setting the bar for quality and reliability we would still be driving the junk the big three was putting out in the 60′s, 70′s and 80′s.

    Reply
  56. Steve

    I don’t think the cruise control quick fix being the only cause of fires. My 2001 F-150 caught fire the same way as others described and my recall had been fixed. Texas Insruments says there’s a lot more going on.

    Reply
  57. Darin

    ….this is all true but this data is WOEFULLY unqualified. in 09 Ford recalled 4.52mil vehicles – NONE OF THESE VEHICLES WERE MADE IN THE LAST 6 YRS!…in fact nearly all of them were JUST A CONTINUATION for the faulty cruise control module that may start a fire. Now lets put this big ‘ford engine fire’ recall into perspective here! This is not a engineering inherent design defect like most Toyota recalls. The circuit module was a potentially faulty but outsourced part. Now this part was on 16 million vehicles and out of that number 600 fires occurred, WITH NO INJURIES OR FATALITIES, and one burned down garage. Let’s call a spade a spade here. Ford wast raked over the coals for this by the media, and import car lovers CONSTANTLY refer to this recall as a big deal and a statement of Ford lack of competence. The fact is that this recall was statistically a non issue.

    Sure many people died in the Explorer/Firestone tire debauchery – but the bottom line was that the Firestone Tires were woefully defective and that Ford’s mistake was to use them without testing them thoroughly, especially when dropping the recommended pressure to 26psi. The big investigation also concluded that Ford was negligent by not widening the track 2″ is patent nonsense as this logic could be applied to dozens of vehicles over the years including some Toyota’s that by nature of design are much more likely to flip than a regular car. Again Ford got roasted for this one. Essentially it was crap defective tires with questionable driving manoeuvres, giving Ford much more fallout dropped on their shoulders than they really deserved. Ditto the media and the import lovers jumping on Ford….all the while Toyota covers up evidence of faulty roof structure in their Suv’s/trucks FOR YEARS!

    Now Toyota in 09 has far more complaints of unintended acceleration events/accidents documented by the NHTSA THAN ALL THE OTHER AUTO MAKERS COMBINED! IN FACT, IS HAS INCREASED 10 FOLD IN NINE YEARS! THIS ARTICLE ATTEMPTING TO MINIMIZE THE SERIOUSNESS OF TOYOTA’S POTENTIAL NEGLIGENCE IS STUPEFYING, WHEN CLEARLY THE ISSUE HERE IS NOT THAT AUTO MAKERS MAKE MISTAKES, IT IS THE INHERENT DESIGN NATURE OF TOYOTA’S MISTAKES (MANY OTHER EXAMPLES THAT THE PRESS NEVER TOUCHED!), AND MOST IMPORTANTLY, THE FACT THAT TOYOTA KNEW AT LEAST 3 YRS AGO THAT THERE WAS A PROBLEM, AND DID NOTHING TO CORRECT IT! THIS IS NOT A NEW PHENOMENON BY ANY MEANS FOR TOYOTA AND I INVITE PEOPLE TO INVESTIGATE NUMEROUS OTHER EVENTS WHERE TOYOTA KNOWINGLY ALLOWED IT’S CUSTOMERS TO DRIVE DEFECTIVE CARS FOR YEARS! AS FOR THE OBAMA GM MEDIA, GOV’T CONSPIRACY THEORISTS, ASK YOURSELF WHY A GOV’T AGENCY THE NHTSA ROLLED OVER FOR TOYOTA 3 YRS AGO WHEN THE EVIDENCE WAS IN THEIR HANDS. NOT ONLY THIS, STATE FARM INSURANCE RAISED PREMIUMS ON TOYOTA PRODUCTS DUE TO THE RISING CLAIMS AND POTENTIAL PROBLEMS – AND EVEN NOTIFIED THE NHTSA OF THIS IN 2007! WHILE ADMITTING THAT THEY ARE NOT QUALIFIED AUTO ENGINEERS, STATE FARM HUMBLY REQUESTED THAT THE NHTSA MIGHT WANT TO HAVE A LOOK AT THE POTENTIAL PROBLEMS WITH TOYOTAS!

    I invite people to research Toyota’s truths and myths…..you will be shocked! Like Toyota’s black box secrets. Millions more to be recalled and much more will come of this recall

    Reply

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